Coffee Inspiration: TEDtalk

As I gear up for a well-deserved break — and return to the origin of my coffee inspiration — I leave you with a couple inspirational coffee-themed independent TED talks.

Consumer Habits: Coffee “To-Go” in Europe

22 October 2012: by Bob O’Brien
Global Senior Vice President at The NPD Group

I’m reading “Zero History” by William Gibson.  It is the last book of a trilogy that pretty much predicted YouTube and applications like Layar before there was any reasonable way for either to exist. And, yes, he gave us the term “cyberspace” in 1982.

This book is nominally about marketing…or maybe not, it’s hard to tell.  It was a little unsettling when he had the protagonist (Or maybe she’s not. Again, hard to tell.) stay in the same random Paris hotel where my wife and I mistakenly spent the first night of our honeymoon.  It was more unsettling when I read this:

“…she wondered exactly when coffee had gone walkabout in France.  When she’d first been here, drinking coffee hadn’t been a pedestrian activity.  One either sat to do it, in cafes or restaurants, or stood, at bars or on railway platforms, and drank from sturdy vessels, china or glass, themselves made in France.  Had Starbucks brought the takeaway cup? she wondered. She doubted it.  They hadn’t really had the time.  More likely McDonald’s.”

I love the term “gone walkabout.”  No offence to my fellow NPD bloggers but that little snippet is likely the best writing you’ll come across in this or any NPD blog.

For the past couple of years, I’ve included my own little riff on this in presentations I’ve done at conferences.

In 1997, when I was meeting with folks from our various European offices to brief them on CREST foodservice industry research and how we use it to help the industry make decisions, an Italian guy in the audience raised his hand and said “that chart is wrong”.  We were looking at a chart that showed how consumers in the US consumed coffee.  It showed the dayparts.  It showed the restaurant channels.  It also showed where consumers actually drank their coffee.  That part of the chart showed that about 40% (maybe more, I don’t remember exactly now) was consumed off-premises…on the go.

My colleague said that this couldn’t be correct.  ”Coffee is not for carrying!  Coffee is to be ordered from a bar and consumed at the bar or at a table, with someone.”  We discussed the issues and concluded that the chart was correct and that Americans were ridiculous, which I’ve found is a satisfactory conclusion to conversations for most people in the world.

Further to this conversation, I heard a presentation by a woman named Vanessa Kullman, the founder of Balzac Coffee in Hamburg.  She told the story of how, interviewing people walking by the front door of what was to be her first shop, they universally rejected the idea of buying coffee in a paper cup and taking it away.  She had to buy the cups and tops in the US and warehouse them in Germany because there was no European source.  At the time of her presentation she had over 50 shops.  Gutsy.

But:  in 2000, as the chart below shows, nobody bought coffee to go in the countries we track.  Today, a huge chunk of Northern European consumers buy coffee to go.  Coffee hasn’t just “gone walkabout” in France. It’s everywhere.  And, it’s not just a global brand that did it, Vanessa Kullman and other gutsy business people did it all over the place.

Cafe Hounding: Verve Coffee

Verve Coffee Roasters
816 41st Avenue
Santa Cruz, CA 95062
Phone: (831) 475-7776

http://www.vervecoffeeroasters.com/

Awesome service, attention to coffee, and people.

Kris checked this place out when stopping through Santa Cruz while galavanting through California per usual.  The life of a professor… The atmosphere at Verve is relaxing in true Californian style.  Plenty of natural light and wood and metal decor reminiscent of Urban Outfitters in its layout.  The shop is located only a couple of blocks from the Pacific Ocean, which undoubtedly adds to the tranquil feel.

The beans are roasted next door in their own facility – it appears they also sell wholesale across the country. Check out their website to make sure. Verve is among the most raved about roasters in the continental US and their baristas are talented enough to consistently make a splash at the annual SCAA barista competitions.  Unfortunately for Kris, during his visit the top baristas were actually in Houston competing in the SCAA annual competition on the national stage.  The staff are super fun and friendly and the wifi is very, very free.

Two paws up for this place.  We look forward to continuing to sample their coffee throughout 2012!

- Cafe Hound

Cafe Hounding: Echo Coffee

Echo Coffee
2902 N 68th St, Ste 135
Scottsdale, AZ 85251
Phone: (480) 422 4081

http://www.echocoffee.com
Groovy spot in Phoenix suburbs.

Kris visited this spot in December 2011 and noted that they roast coffee on site every other day in small batches.  Echo, owned by Steve Belt, opened in mid-2010 by the inspired graduate of Tempe, Arizona’s major university, Arizona State University.

Steve chatted briefly with Kris while roasting beans and briefly mentioned his origins from Portland, Oregon.  With a modern, high-ceiling, loft-like layout and a good selection of pastries – Echo is a good place to set up shop, use the free wifi, and get on with life over a delicious cup of Papua New Guinea, Cameroon, and Kenyan coffees sourced from a local importer who claims the beans are “carbon neutral.”

Make sure to check this place out if you’re stopping through!

- Cafe Hound

Bean Counting: Idido Natural Sun-dried – Counter Culture

Roaster: Counter Culture
Place of Purchase: Peregrine Espresso (14th St. NW Location)
Preferred Brew Method: Paper Filter Drip (pour over)
Excerpt From Counter Culture Describing Coffee:

Yirgacheffe, Ethiopia
Organic • Shade Grown
The community of Idido, just outside the town of Yirgacheffe, has once again produced the quintessential Ethiopian Natural Sundried coffee. One of the cleanest and most refined naturals we have tasted in years, Idido offers notes of strawberry, blueberry, and orange zest with a balanced, chocolate-like sweetness.

Cafe Hound Review:   Generally, Counter Culture got this one right. This coffee cups clean, though it has  enough of what I call, “berry funk” to entertain your palate. I cycled through several of the Counter Culture coffees this year, with the Central Americans admittedly disappointing after a VERY strong showing in 2009, and a decent showing in 2010. In 2010 my favorite growing region of the world ended up being Kenya, though the Cafe Hound annual blend at the end of 2009 included a fair amount of sun-dried Ethiopian coffee from the Amaro region. (washed version for sale at Novo now). Right now, this Yirgacheffe is rocking my world. I admit that as the weather cools here in the Nation’s Capital, I’m leaning towards more bold and fruity coffees – though I enjoy a clean cup so much that I rarely venture to the extremes of many Indonesian grown coffees (Sumatra). Though, it is all a matter of taste and I encourage you to post your comments letting us know what your preferences are this year! Happy Hounding!

info@cafehound.com